Monthly Archives: February 2007

Posting unfinished posts

So I haven’t been posting anything here for a while, ironically because I’ve been so busy working on stuff that likely could be worthy of a blog post or two. A lot of times what happens is that I start writing something and then lo and behold something else comes up (like right now, one of my co-workers is trying to get my attention – ah, saved by the bell, or his cell phone in this case) – and the thing gets saved as a draft, sort of like the gazillion drafts in my Outlook folder and my gmail folder (though gmail drafts sometimes get used as temporary storage, though that is yet another post to be written)

Anyway, here is a sampling of the stuff that never got posted:

screen cap of blog drafts

Outgoogling google

In the article “Looking for the next Google” in today’s New York Times, MIGUEL HELFT describes the efforts of numerous start-ups trying to take on the search Guggernaut.

“you earn your right to be in business every day, page view after page view, click after click,” said Barney Pell, a founder and the chief executive of Powerset, whose search service is not yet available.

When are we going to stop calling it Ajax?
I’m starting to lose count of all the meetings I’ve sat in, and articles I’ve read, where there is a constant reference to Ajax – we want to use a lot of ajax, this is going to be an ajaxy site – in some ways, this reminds me of the days of words like ‘database-driven’ and user-centric’ – what well-designed site is not user-centric? what commercial site (marketing one-offs notwithstanding) is not database-driven? I guess my point is that describing a site with terms like this is stating something that is a complete given, and I can’t wait for the same to become true with ‘Ajax’ – all we’re talking about is an element-level refresh on the page, mimicking desktop functionality.

Emailing as part of basic reading/writing skills

I recently received the following email from a real estate professional
Subject: “Re:”

——————————————————–

This e mail is for the named addressees only. If you are not the intended recipient, please delete it from your files. If you do not wish to receive commercial emails from me in the future and like to “Opt-Out” please click email address at end of this email and hit send or reply back to your sender with subject “remove me from your list.” All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, change of price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. No representation is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footage are approximate and all information should be confirmed by customer. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reserved to Broker.

 

3 attachments — Download all attachments
customerpacket1.pdf
customerpacket2.pdf
20K View as HTML Download
mediareport.pdf
779K View as HTML Download

[This raises another issue – how to represent email on a web page – I guess I am using the memo metaphor here…]

So basically this is an email with a blank subject heading and no content other than the automatic footer and the attachments. Because email has become such an integral part of how we interact with one another, it would seem as if there is a need for thinking about raising the importance of email to the same level as reading and writing in general. In other words, understanding the importance of a meaningful subject heading (particularly if you’re sending a message to someone in a business context) and understanding that sending someone a few megs worth of attachments may not be the best way to get on their good side.

With all these unfinished posts (and there are lots and lots more), it makes me wonder if there is a need for a tool that facilitates posting stuff that is either half-baked or facilitates finishing it. For example, stuff that is still in progress just have some kind of ‘DRAFT’ watermark under it, and then there could be an option to allow site visitors to make revisions and comments, so that you’re basically writing a post together, rather than one person writing and other’s commenting. Could have some potential, I guess. But I’ll leave that for another unfinished post :)